A history of the hong kong cinema

Andy Lau Efforts by local filmmakers to refinish their product have had mixed results overall. It also banned the wildly popular wuxia genre of martial arts swordplay and fantasy, accusing it of promoting superstition and violent anarchy. Alex Fong In the s, there have been some bright spots.

Detailed accounts of this period therefore have inherent limitations and uncertainties.

List of cinemas in Hong Kong

But unlike on the Mainland, the occupiers were not able to put together a collaborationist film industry. A newly aggressive push by Hollywood studios into the Asian market. They made over fifty films together, The Purple Hairpin being one of the most enduringly popular Teo, Like the New Wavers, they tended to be graduates of overseas film schools and local television apprenticeships, and to be interested in going beyond the usual, commercial subject matters and styles.

The Martial Arts craze would take shape as the Shaw Brothers become the foremost authority regarding the kung-fu craze that would follow in the wake of their massive quantity of quality movies.

This primitive camera trick was employed and became a trademark aspect of martial arts films to follow. This would be the first time in years the Shaw Brothers would have a rival studio. The colony also did big business exporting films to Southeast Asian countries especially but not exclusively due to their large Chinese expatriate communities and to Chinatowns in Western countries Bordwell, Cantonese cinema virtually vanished in the face of Mandarin studios and Cantonese television, which became available to the general population in ; in no films in the local dialect were made Bordwell, They even found a lesser foothold in Japanwith its own highly developed and better-funded cinema and strong taste for American movies; Jackie Chan in particular became popular there.

The heroes of these films, endowed with palm power, beams of energy with which they could control their flying swords and enhance their combat skills. But the borrowings are filtered through elements from traditional Chinese drama and artparticularly a penchant for stylisation and a disregard for Western standards of realism.

The martial arts subgenre of the kung fu movie exploded into popularity internationally, with the Shaws driving and dominating the wave. The Hui movies also broke ground by satirising the modern reality of an ascendant middle class, whose long work hours and dreams of material success were transforming the colony into a modern industrial and corporate giant Teo, These early films also founded the reverse jumping technique: Other hallmarks of this era included the gangster or " Triad " movie trend launched by director John Woo, producer and long-time actor Alan Tang and dominated by actor Chow Yun-fat ; romantic melodramas and martial arts fantasies starring Brigitte Lin ; the comedies of stars like Cherie Chung and Stephen Chow; traditional kung fu movies dominated by Jet Li ; and contemporary, stunt -driven kung fu action epitomised by the work of Jackie Chan.

Big-Head Monster and The Eyeoften modeled on the Japanese horror films then making an international splash. This became a flood with the resumption of the Chinese Civil War which had been on hold during the fight against Japan and then the Communist victory. Fists of Fury,Fist of Fury a.

The era of the studio juggernauts was past. The Fund has received a mixed reception from industry participants, and less than enthusiastic reception from financial institutions who perceive investment in local films as high risk ventures with little collateral. Even in the days of silent cinema, Hong Kong proved that their filmmakers could make entertaining and quality movies despite any number of hardships that they might encounter.

Filmed Cantonese operas proved even more successful than wuxia and constituted the leading genre of the s.The History of Hong Kong Action Cinema Pt.

4 – New Wave This article is part of a series on the history of Hong Kong action cinema - find the other parts here.

The 's and 70's are probably the most pivotal time regarding the growth of. Hong Kong cinema was born long before the stardom of Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan, or the arthouse films of Wong Kar-Wai and Ann Hui.

Instead, the story of Hong Kong’s film industry begins back in the early 20th century. The Cinema of Hong Kong examines one of the most popular and dynamic cinema traditions in the history of film. Providing an overview of major directors, genres and stars, from its origins to the present, this volume examines Hong Kong cinema in transnational, historical, and artistic contexts.5/5(1).

The History of Hong Kong Action Cinema Pt. 1 – The Pioneers When I was young my Uncle Fred was our gateway to cool movies at a young age.

A Brief History of Hong Kong Cinema to 1988 – Film Studios and Personalities

He would babysit my brother and I, and going to the video store (yes, VHS) was. The Cinema of Hong Kong examines one of the most popular and dynamic cinema traditions in the history of film.

Providing an overview of major directors, genres and stars, from its origins to the present, this volume examines Hong Kong cinema in transnational, historical, and artistic contexts.3/5(1). List of cinemas in Hong Kong.

Cinema of Hong Kong

Jump to navigation Jump to search. This is a list of current and Kwun Chung Theatre, at 30 Kwun Chung Street, Kwun Chung; was Hong Kong's last adult cinema until it closed on March 15, ; .

Download
A history of the hong kong cinema
Rated 3/5 based on 24 review